Correlates of Posttraumatic Growth Following a Myocardial Infarction: A Systematic Review AND The Lived Experience of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Religiosity: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

  • Gayle Hegarty

Student thesis: Doctoral ThesisDoctor of Philosophy

Abstract

Correlates of posttraumatic growth (PTG) have been examined in the area of health psychology previously, with much focus on aspects of personality, coping and social support. This systematic review aimed to examine correlates of PTG for those who have experienced a Myocardial Infarction (MI). Studies which met inclusion criteria were assessed for quality and reviewed. Results showed an inconsistent strength of associations between studies and so conclusions cannot be drawn. Possible reasons for these differences are discussed and recommendations for future research are suggested.

This paper explores the idiographic nature and personal meaning that OCD and religiosity present. Ten detailed interviews were conducted with individuals diagnosed as having OCD who also identified as being religious (Christian). The interviews were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analytical approach.

Northern Ireland has the highest church attending population within the United Kingdom and a qualitative study into the lived experience of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) and religiosity had never previously been conducted here. Given the unique population in Northern Ireland, and its levels of church attendance, this study offers an insight into this disorder in this place. Themes of OCD and faith intertwined, OCD impacting internal and open faith practice, and OCD blocking connection to God were identified. The interconnection conceptually, through behaviour and belief is discussed, with implications for assessment, formulation and intervention in clinical practice and future research.
Date of AwardJul 2020
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • Queen's University Belfast
SupervisorDonncha Hanna (Supervisor), Lesley Storey (Supervisor) & Martin Dempster (Supervisor)

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