Towards an increased understanding of Reminiscence Therapy for people with dementia: a narrative analysis / How is the concept of communicative openness explored, meanings evolved, for those with experience of post-adoption contact interactions: a grounded theory study?

  • Fiona Macleod

Student thesis: Doctoral ThesisDoctor of Philosophy

Abstract

(1) Towards an increased understanding of Reminiscence Therapy for people with dementia: a narrative analysis

Abstract

Aim: Reminiscence therapy (RT) is an established therapeutic intervention for people with dementia. This review set out to provide a better understanding of RT through a deeper analysis of its contents and delivery.
Method: This review examined 22 studies from the most recent Cochrane review (Woods et al., 2018) and addressed logistical and theoretical questions. Multiple and layered narrative analyses were completed.
Findings: The heterogeneity and limitation of the data somewhat prevented this review from providing a comprehensive and conclusive overview of RT content, delivery and commonalities. However, based on the available data the review identified 13 RT components. ‘Memory triggers’ and ‘themes’ were identified as the most common but were found not to be consistently beneficial. RT was typically delivered in a care setting using a group approach; however, there was inconsistency in session composition, intervention duration, as well as the training and supervision provided to RT facilitators. Operationalisation of theory within RT was not identified. RT was not consistently delivered according to a programme/model. Lastly, as a result of a small number of studies, the RT components ‘life stages’, ‘activities’, and ‘family only sessions’, showed beneficial promise. In summary, this review highlights that RT needs more consistency in content and delivery, in addition to a clear theoretical framework.

Keywords:
Dementia, Reminiscence Therapy, Therapy


(2) How is the concept of communicative openness explored, meanings evolved, for those with experience of post-adoption contact interactions: a grounded theory study?

Abstract

Aim: To explore the constructions of communicative openness following adoption.
Method: Interview data was collected, transcribed verbatim, and analysed simultaneously in keeping with a constructivist grounded theory methodology (Charmaz, 2006). Three waves of data collection were completed involving six adoptive mothers and four foster carers. Data from the sixth adoptive mother interview formed a negative case analysis.
Findings: This study has evidenced that how family is constructed can either facilitate or impede communicative openness. Those who operationalise a fluid, child-centred construction of family, who are willing to construct family as different, and can accept the ebb and flow of family membership, intuitively view communicative openness as a natural part of caring for children. Those who hold a more traditional, nuclear construction of family, may associate adoption with fear, a sense of biological related competition, and the need to control the controllable. This study evidenced these factors are barriers to communicative openness. This study has evidenced that communicative openness is person and context sensitive. The need to think more creatively and flexibly about family has been highlighted, along with practice recommendations.

Keywords
Communicative openness, construction of family, adoption, adoptive parents, foster carers, parenting
Date of AwardDec 2020
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • Queen's University Belfast
SupervisorKatrina McLaughlin (Supervisor), Lesley Storey (Supervisor), Teresa Rushe (Supervisor), Michele Kavanagh (Supervisor) & Francis Agnew (Supervisor)

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • Reminiscence Therapy
  • Therapy
  • Communicative openness
  • Construction of family
  • Adoption
  • Adoptive parents
  • Foster carers
  • Parenting

Cite this

Towards an increased understanding of Reminiscence Therapy for people with dementia: a narrative analysis / How is the concept of communicative openness explored, meanings evolved, for those with experience of post-adoption contact interactions: a grounded theory study?
Macleod, F. (Author). Dec 2020

Student thesis: Doctoral ThesisDoctor of Philosophy